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Oregon Eclipse

The weekend is fast approaching. Everyone’s talking about this once-in-a-lifetime event. The great solar eclipse is upon us in just under a week and Oregon just happens to be in the path of totality! With this remarkable view, it’s estimated that over 1 million+ people will be visiting our beautiful state to witness the event. It will start around 9 am and the full eclipse will take place around 10 am. With an influx of traffic and, you know, actively staring at the sun, NASA has some helpful tips on safety for the big event. Check it out below!

From NASA:

An eclipse is a rare and striking phenomenon you won’t want to miss, but you must carefully follow safety procedures. Don’t let the requisite warnings scare you away from witnessing this singular spectacle! You can experience the eclipse safely, but it is vital that you protect your eyes at all times with the proper solar filters. No matter what recommended technique you use, do not stare continuously at the sun. Take breaks and give your eyes a rest! Do not use sunglasses: they don’t offer your eyes sufficient protection. The only acceptable glasses are safe viewers designed for looking at the sun and solar eclipses. One excellent resource on how to determine if your viewers are safe can be found here: https://eclipse.aas.org/eye-safety/iso-certification

  • If you are within the path of totality, remove your solar filter only when the moon completely covers the sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark. Experience totality, then, as soon as the bright sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to look at the remaining partial phases.
  • Always inspect your solar filter before use; if scratched or damaged, discard it. Read and follow any instructions printed on or packaged with the filter.
  • Always supervise children using solar filters.
  • Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright sun. After looking at the sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the sun.
  • Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical devices.
  • Similarly, do not look at the sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury.
  • Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device. Note that solar filters must be attached to the front of any telescope, binoculars, camera lens, or other optics.
  • If you normally wear eyeglasses, keep them on. Put your eclipse glasses on over them, or hold your handheld viewer in front of them

Car Safety
Planning to Drive the Eclipse(link is external)
https://www.ready.gov/car(link is external)

Camping Health and Safety
https://www.cdc.gov/family/camping/(link is external)
http://www.recreation.gov/recFacilityActivitiesHomeAction.do?goto=camping.htm&activities=9(link is external)

Heat and Children in Cars 
http://www.safercar.gov/parents/InandAroundtheCar/heatstroke.htm(link is external)
http://www.safercar.gov/parents/InandAroundtheCar/heat-involved.html(link is external)